Analysis ” the last leaf”

Group 4 Outline Exercise 1: Listen to advice of international students about culture shock. Exercise 2: Listen to report of sport A: Fill in the blank B: Chose true (T), false (F) or not given (NG) Exercise 3: Listen to song and fill the blanks. Exercise 4: Listen a suggestion. Exercise 1: You are going to hear an international student adviser giving advice on culture shock.

Listen and complete the notes below using NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer. Ways to minimize the effects of culture shock It’s important to understand that culture shock can …1…. …………. Keep 2…………………friends and family at home, through phone call or e-mail.

Make sure you have …3………….

.. of your friends and family, Make new friends – 5……………………. will understand what you’re feeling. Also make friends with local students if you can. Use the drop-in centre and other services which can give you 6…………………… beside , you may not use a service support networks , so the most important thing is to find some people who will listen 7…………….

, rather than .. 8…………….. culture is usually …9…………… in fact , is can be a …10……………………….

. experience , making you more aware of aspect of your own culture as well as the new culture . Exercise 2: a. Fill in the blank . The marathon has……….

the imagination of all over the world 2.

The biggest marathon in the nation is the…………marathon 3. On November fifth, almost……………. people finished the race. 4. The first women’s marathon was hold in ……in Los Angeles, California.

b. Chose true (T), false (F) or not given (NG): 5. Jelena Prokopcuka of Latvia was the men’s champion in just over two hours and twenty-five minutes. 6. The most famous person in the race is Lance Armstrong.

7. The Boston marathon is the oldest marathon race. 8. Roberta Gibb became the first women in Boston’s marathon. .

Marathon race is held every year in US. 10. Forty-five percent of marathon runner in US is forty years old or older. Exercise 3: Listen to song and fill the blanks: Hello Viet Nam Tell me all about this name that is 1…………… to say. It was given me the day I was born. Want to know about the stories of the 2………….

of old. My eyes say more of me than what you 3…………. to say All I know of you is all the 4………………. of war. A film by Coppola, the helicopter’s roar. One day I’ll touch your soil .

One day I’ll finally know your soul. One day I’ll come to you. To say hello… Vietnam.

Tell me all about my 5…………………, my hair and my little feet  That have carried me every 6………………… of the way. Want to see your house, your streets Show me all I do not know. Wooden sampans7………………. , light of gold. All I know of you is all the sights of war. A film by Coppola, the helicopter’s roar.

One day I’ll touch your soil . One day I’ll finally know your soul. One day I’ll come to you. To say hello..

. Vietnam. And Buddha 8………………. of stone watch over me. My dreams, they lead me through the fields of 9……………… In prayer, in the light..

. I see my 10……………… I touch my tree, my roots, my begin…

One day I’ll walk your soil .

One day I’ll finally know my soul. One day I’ll come to you. To say hello…

Vietnam. To say xin chao… Vietnam. Glossary: Wooden sampans: boat is made in wood Root: origin Floating markets: markets on the river Empire: country Exercise 4: Questions 1- 10 Questions 1-3 Circle the correct answer According to the fist speaker: 1 The focus of the lecture series is on A.

organizing work and studyC. coping with homesickness B. maintaining a healthy lifestyleD. settling in at university 2The lecture will be given by A. the president of the UnionC.

a sports celebrity B. the campus doctorD. healthy expert According to the second speaker: 3This week lecture is on A. campus foodC. sensible eating B. dietingD.

saving money Questions 4-7 Complete them, Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answers A balanced diet A balanced diet will give you enough vitamins for normal daily living Vitamins in food can be lost through (4)…..

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. Types of vitamin a. Fast soluble vitamins are stored by body b. Water soluble vitamins – not stored, so you need a (5)..

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. Getting enough vitamins

Eat (6) ….

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… of foods. Buy plenty of vegetables and store them in (7).

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…. Questions 8-9 Complete the diagram by writing NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS in the boxed provided 9.

. Bread, vegetables and fruit . . Bread, vegetables and fruit 8…………………………………. Milk, lean meat, fish, nuts, eggs .

. Milk, lean meat, fish, nuts, eggs . .

Milk, lean meat, fish, nuts, eggs . .

Milk, lean meat, fish, nuts, eggs Example Try to avoid . Sugar, salt and butter Answer key: Exercise 3: Answer keys: Exercise 1: 1 – in touch 2 –photos 3-our country 4-international student 5-(some) support Exercise 2: a. 1. Captured 2. New York City 3.

38000 4. 1984 b. 5. F (woman not men) 6. T 7. T 8.

T 9. NG 10. F (43% not 45%) Exercise 3: 1. Difficult 2. Empire 3. Dare 4.

Sights 5. Color 6. Mile 7. Floating markets 8. Made 9. Rice 10.

Kin Exercise 4: 1. Trap scripts Exercise 1:

So this afternoon we’ve been talking a bit about culture shock and your experiences of culture shock so far in adjusting to life in this country. Maybe this hasn’t happened to you and you are thinking it won’t because you’re from Europe or you’ve done a lot of travelling before. But it is important to understand that culture shock can hit you whatever culture you come from and however well travelled you are. It’s a perfectly normal experience, if a little worrying when is does happen to you. There are some things you can do, however, to help yourself get through it.

First of all do keep in touch with home.

Aki, on student reception can help you to by a phone card to make cheaper calls home and you can always e-mail friends and family from Resource Centre if you haven’t brought any photos of friends and family get them to send you some so you can feel at home. Make sure you eat well- not just crisps and chocolate! And it’s a good idea if you can eat some familiar food. Other students from your country . and you need to exercise, too- not only for your health.

And it’s a good way of meeting people. Make some new friends. Get know the other international students, whether from your own country or others.

They will understand some-thing of what you’re feeling and their experience may be able to help you. And if you can, try to make friends with the local home students. That way you can really learn this new culture and they can learn about yours.

Let us help you! You’re here at the orientation program which is a good start, but we also offer a drop-in Centre with a student advisor available daily and personal counseling. You might not use such a service at home, but remember that you perhaps don’t have the same support networks of friends and family here and these services can provide you with some support.

The most important thing is to find someone who will listen uncritically and with understanding, rather than isolating yourself. You need to remember that culture shock is entirely normal and usually unavoidable . It’s not a sign that you’ve made a mistake of can’t manage.

In fact is can be a significant learning experience, making you more aware of aspects of your own culture as well as the new culture. It will give you valuable skills which will be part of the benefit of an international education. Exercise 2: Welcome to THIS IS AMERICA in VOA Special English. I’m Steve Ember. And I’m Barbara Klein. Many people enjoy running.

But one kind of race, the marathon, has captured the imagination of people all over the world. The race has roots in ancient history. But there is nothing ancient about today’s modern sports and social events. Many Americans enjoy the experience of running a forty-two kilometer race. Three hundred fourteen marathons were held in the United States last year.

An estimated three hundred eighty-two thousand runners completed these marathons. And that number is expected to increase this year. The biggest marathon in the nation is the New York City marathon. The runners pass famous landmarks in America’s most famous city.

It also is a major sporting event with at least one hundred thousand dollars going to each winner.

On November fifth, almost thirty-eight thousand people finished the race. Marilson Gomes dos Santos of Brazil was the men’s champion in just under two hours and ten minutes. Jelena Prokopcuka of Latvia was the women’s champion for the second straight year. She finished in just over two hours and twenty-five minutes. The most famous person in the race, however, may have been bicyclist Lance Armstrong. The seven-time Tour de France champion made big news by running in this year’s race.

Armstrong’s excellent physical condition helped him complete the marathon in just under three hours. Fewer than two percent of all marathon runners do that. But, after the race, Armstrong admitted that the race was “ the hardest physical thing I have ever done. ” While the New York City marathon is the biggest, the Boston Marathon in Massachusetts is the oldest and equally famous. The Boston Athletic Association started the race in eighteen ninety-seven. That is less than one year after the first Olympic marathon in Athens, Greece.

Boston is unlike most other big marathons because it is held in April.

Boston is also famous for another first. Roberta Gibb became the first woman to unofficially run that marathon in nineteen sixty-six. At the time, male racing officials did not believe women could run marathons. It was not until nineteen seventy-two that women could officially compete in Boston. The Olympics did not hold a women’s marathon event until nineteen eighty-four in Los Angeles, California.

Today’s marathons do not bar anyone because of sex or age. Many middle-aged people like to spend a weekend visiting a new city and running a marathon there. Time magazine has called the middle-aged people of today the “ marathon generation.   Forty-three percent of marathon runners in the United States are forty years old or older. The sport has spread among people who are interested in health and fitness.

The lifestyle of this age group has changed a lot since the nineteen seventies when many marathons started to be organized. Racing has expanded to average runners. They can take part in races from five to ten kilometers. Hundreds of these races are organized in the United States every year. They are often in connection with a cause like fighting disease or supporting local hospitals and schools. Exercise 3:

Hello Viet Nam Tell me all about this name that is difficult to say.

It was given me the day I was born. Want to know about the stories of the empire of old. My eyes say more of me than what you dare to say All I know of you is all the sights of war. A film by Coppola, the helicopter’s roar. One day I’ll touch your soil . One day I’ll finally know your soul.

One day I’ll come to you. To say hello… Vietnam.

Tell me all about my colour, my hair and my little feet That have carried me every mile of the way. Want to see your house, your streets Show me all I do not know.

Wooden sampans, floating markets, light of gold. All I know of you is all the sights of war. A film by Coppola, the helicopter’s roar.

One day I’ll touch your soil . One day I’ll finally know your soul. One day I’ll come to you. To say hello..

. Vietnam. And Buddha made of stone watch over me. My dreams, they lead me through the fields of rice. In prayer, in the light..

. I see my kin. I touch my tree, my roots, my begin… One day I’ll walk your soil .

One day I’ll finally know my soul. One day I’ll come to you. To say hello… Vietnam. To say xin chao… Vietnam. Exercise 4: J: John D: Diane Greenbaum

J: Good morning, good morning, everyone, and welcome to our regular lecture on health issues. This series of lecture is organized by the Student‘ s Union and is part of the union‘ s attempt to help you, the students of this university, to stay healthy while coping with study and social life at the same time. So it’s great pleasure for me to welcome back Ms Diane Greenbaums who is a professional dietician and who has been kind enough to give up her time, in what I know is a very hectic schedule, to come along and talk to us today. D: Thank you. Thank you very much, John. May I say it’s a pleasure to be back?

Now, stresses at university, being away from home and having to look after yourself, learning your way around the campus all contribute to making it quite hard sometimes to ensure that your diet is adequate. So today I’m going to talk about ways of making sure that you eat well while at the same time staying within your budget. If you have a well balances diet, then you should be getting all the vitamins that you need for normal daily living. However, sometimes we think we’re eating the right foods but the vitamins are escaping, perhaps as a result of cooking and anyway we’re not getting the full benefit of them.

Now, if you lack vitamins in any way, the solution isn’t to rush off and take vitamins pills, though they can sometimes help. No, it’s far better to look at your diet and how you prepare your food. So what are vitamins? Well, the dictionary tells us they are “ food factors essential in small quantities to maintain life”. Now, there are fat soluble vitamins which can be stores for quite some time by the body and there are so a regular daily intake of these ones is needed. Ok, so how can you ensure that your diet contains enough of the vitamins you need?

Well, first of all, you may have to establish some new eating habits! No more chips at the uni canteen, I’m afraid! Now, firstly, you must eat a variety of foods. Then you need to ensure that you eat at least four servings of fruit and vegetables daily. Now you’ll need to shop two or three times a week to make sure that they’re fresh, and store your vegetables in the fridge or in a cool, dark place. Now let’s just refresh our memories by looking at the Healthy Diet Pyramid. Ok, can you all see that? Good. Well, now, as you see, we’ve got three levels to our pyramid.

At the top in the smallest area are the things which we should really be trying to avoid as much as possible. Things like… yes, sugar, butter… all that sort of thing. Next, on the middle of our pyramid we find the things that we can eat in moderation. Not too much though! And that’s where we find milk, lean meat, fish, nuts, eggs. And then at the bottom of the pyramid are the things that you can eat lots of! Because they’re the things that are really good for you, and here we have bread, vegetables and fruit. So don’t lose sight of your healthy diet pyramid when you do your shopping.